Letter of William Williams describing Tonawandas prospects, transcribed (1835-04-21).jpeg

Letter of William Williams describing Tonawandas prospects (1835-04-21).jpeg
Letter of William Williams describing Tonawandas prospects 2 (1835-04-21).jpeg
Letter of William Williams describing Tonawandas prospects 3 (1835-04-21).jpeg
Letter of William Williams describing Tonawandas prospects 4 (1835-04-21).jpeg
Letter of William Williams describing Tonawandas prospects 5 (1835-04-21).jpeg

Dublin Core

Title

Letter of William Williams describing Tonawandas prospects, transcribed (1835-04-21).jpeg

Description

Tonawanda April 21, 1835
H. Huntington, Esq.

Respected and Dear Sir,

Your favor of 11th inst was this morning received, postmarked 13th inst.
In the original purchase of Lots No. 84 & 85 there were four equal undivided shares, Townsend & Coit, Latham A. Burrows, A.H. Tracy and myself. In 1829 we mutually made a partition, Townsend & Coit and A.H. Tracy taking that part of the village plot, excepting 3½ acres, which lies north of the canal, about 35 ¾ acres, Burrows taking a small Block of village lots lying north of the canal and between the side cut into the Niagara River, and the toll bridge and on the guard lock, embracing one acre and a half as his proportion of said Lots Nos. 84 & 85, on condition that I should finish a wharf previously commenced, when we were joint owners, on his giving 6 mo. notice after he had built a tavern house and outhouses worth not less than three thousand dollars. The balance of the Tonawanda joint property came into my hands except some village lots previously sold and a few on which articles had been issued; say in all about three acres more. Burrows having erected his tavern house and given me notice that the wharfing must be done, to accommodate the Steamboat that has engaged to enter the mouth of the Tonawanda creek, I am redeeming my engagement with him, and as I think benefitting my own property at the same time. I did not intend to convey the idea in my last letter that I was to superintend the work. Mr. James Walker who has been employed in similar works at Buffalo harbor has the job. This explanation appeared necessary to correct an impression probably made by my careless mention of an expenditure of six six hundred dollars for wharfing. It is not safe to come into the Tonawanda without a wharf and snubbing posts, there not being room to swing around in the creek, without these advantages in handling the Boat.

At times I fear you will regard me as visionary altogether in my expectations of this locality ever becoming a place of business. Without foreign capital it never will; but the Island owners have already embarked so much, that, with their amples means they are not likely to back out. Their steam saw mill occupies 22,500 square feet, four stories, & including the attic. It has generally been valued to have cost them 80,000 dollars, whereas it has really cost them but 34,000, as their agent informs me. Their lands were purchased for less than the original sale by the state some ten years since; the average cost being under five dollars. They have the fee to all except ten or fourteen hundred acres. The survey by the state made about 19,000 acres of all the islands. These prominent features of their purchase and improvement show well. Practical men are embarked in the undertaking which is the most favorable to its perpetuity as well as productiveness. Their desire to purchase more land indicates confidence. They cut no trees but those which have come to perfection or are not worth preserving for future use. By thinning out the large oaks the young ones have a vigorous & rapid growth secured them. All the timber of small value is cut and split into seam fuel [more about trees]

William Williams

Date

1835-04-21

Citation

“Letter of William Williams describing Tonawandas prospects, transcribed (1835-04-21).jpeg,” North Tonawanda History, accessed May 19, 2024, https://nthistory.com/items/show/3417.